Growing in Place Symposium 2011

Date: 
Friday, 11 February 2011
Contact the Natural Learning Initiative with questions.
Call 919-515-8345 or send an email.
Click here to see the Symposium Agenda

Restrictions on children's independent mobility are having an increasingly negative impact on their healthy development. Many children are not allowed to venture out alone or even with their friends as the previous generations did. This pressing issue must be addressed by rethinking the design of the urban public realm to better serve the needs of children and families; ultimately, to create a new, inclusive culture of place.

The aim of the Growing In Place Symposium is to stimulate discussion about how planners and designers can enhance the health and wellbeing of urban families in North Carolina, across the nation and world. As urban growth increases, new urban design policies are required to support the needs of citizens across the life span. The Growing In Place Symposium will explore these themes.

This event has passed.  Please click here to see information about the current Growing in Place Symposium.

Presentations

 

01 Growing In Place Symposium (Introductions & Morning Session, Part I)
  • Robin C. Moore, Director, Natural Learing Initiative
  • Mitchell Silver, AICP, Director of the Department of City Planning, Raleigh, NC.
  • Grant Meacci, ASLA, Division Manager, Urban Design Center, Raleigh Department of City Planning, NC.
  • Perry Bigelow, Bigelow Homes, Aurora, IL.
02 Growing In Place Symposium (Morning Session, Part II)
  • Robin C. Moore, Director, Natural Learing Initiative
  • Jason Gilliland, University of Western Ontario, London, ONNT.
  • Michael Wallwork, Alternate Street Design, P.AA., Orange Park, FL.
03 Growing In Place Symposium (Afternoon Session)
  • Robin C. Moore, Director, Natural Learing Initiative
  • John Ackerman, CEO, Occoneecheee Council, Boy Scouts of America, Raleigh, NCC.
  • Abby Ehrlich, Director of Parks Programming, Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, NNYC.
  • Robin C. Moore, Director, Natural Learing Initiative
  • Jason Gilliland, University of Western Ontario, London, ONNT.
  • Michael Wallwork, Alternate Street Design, P.AA., Orange Park, FL.
  • John Ackerman, CEO, Occoneecheee Council, Boy Scouts of America, Raleigh, NCC.
  • Abby Ehrlich, Director of Parks Programming, Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, NNYC.

Registration for this event is closed

Speakers

Mitchell Silver,AICP,Director of the Department of City Planning, Raleigh, NC.

Welcoming remarks.

National urbanism trends, increased urban livability, and potential impact on children and families.

Presentations

Robin Moore, MCP, ASLA, Director, Natural Learning Initiative
NC State University, Raleigh, NC

Permeable urban neighborhoods: Designing shared feet and bike “flow space” for children and families.

Urban designers face a new design imperative to provide for children's access to diversity and independent mobility at neighborhood level. New opportunities for action abound. They include the new healthy lifestyle imperatives framed by the White House Task Force Report on Childhood Obesity and the National Physical Activity Plan; non-motorized transportation programs such as SAFETEA-LU; new initiatives such as Safe Routes to School and Complete Streets; and new built environment standards and guidelines such as the Sustainable Sites Initiative, and LEED-ND. The presentation will introduce these tools and explore how they can be applied to serve children and families, including consideration of housing form and density, and space for nature. Pathways for Play, a new program created by NLI and PlayCore focused on design of pathway networks, will be highlighted.

Perry Bigelow, Bigelow Homes, Aurora, IL.

Designing neighborhoods for children and families: How can we get the development community on board?

Why is it so difficult for the development community to consider deeply the needs of children and families in neighborhood design? What are the major impediments? How can they be overcome? How can the professional design community and child advocates help? The experience of developing a neighborhood in Aurora, IL, and feedback from residents will serve as a case study illustration.

Jason Gilliland, PhD, University of Western Ontario, London, ONT.

Creating urban design policy for healthy childhood neighborhoods: What does built environment behavioral science tell us?

A growing amount of research from North America, Europe, and elsewhere is beginning to inform evidence-based urban design. This presentation will draw on the results of this body of research and the presenter’s own studies to suggest key built environment policy implications to support children’s active, outdoor lifestyles.

Michael Wallwork, Alternate Street Design, P.A., Orange Park, FL.

Balancing motorized and nonmotorized transportation in favor of independent mobility for children: Design solutions that work.

Street design for feet and bike is crucial to support children’s independent mobility – beginning with a sidewalk connection to the child’s front door. For decades, traffic engineering standards in many countries have recognized the particular needs of pedestrians and cyclists – children in particular. How can the US contribute to the further development of these progressive benchmarks? Best practice examples from the US and around the world will be presented.

John Ackerman, CEO, Occoneechee Council, Boy Scouts of America, Raleigh, NC.

Motivating kids to get outdoors in search of adventure: Managing the inherent risk.

Liability, fear of law suit, and safety concerns are a major factor constraining children’s independent mobility, nature play, and engagement with outdoor public environments in general. Boy Scouts of America still manage to provide boys with genuine adventure in the out of doors. How is this achieved safely? How is liability accepted in environments with “inherent risk”? What are the most effective risk management strategies.

Abby Ehrlich, Director of Parks Programming, Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, NYC.

Animating the urban public realm: Programming urban play.

Playwork, play programming, and play management were developed by play professionals in Europe 60 years ago and are being applied in several contexts in the US. Play programming in Battery Park City provides a mature, rich case study in one of the highest density environments in the US. This presentation will describe the program approach, key components, and operation.

Panel discussion.

Moderated by Robin Moore.

Creating healthy urban environments that motivate kids to get outdoors. What critical policy changes are required?

Each speaker’s top 3 suggestions in 3 minutes. Instantly projected for all to see. Presorted questions from participants and discussion from the floor.

See information about previous Growing In Place Symposiums